Latest Tweets:

(Source: quickcilver, via celestialkevin)

I love you, Nick Miller.

(Source: hummely, via newgirlthings)

(Source: tessajem, via wiigz)

Shortfilm about a deaf, black girl who dreams of being a dancer

(Source: feministplayground, via superteenmylittlewholock)

"What a terrible time to get words mixed up. The awkward moment you tell the hairdresser you don’t want a fancy blowjob." - Natalie Tran

(Source: tinakris, via sleepyhypster)

"I mean, I hope you’re happy,
But the sky is still the sky without you,
And I’m not surprised by that anymore."

Caitlyn Siehl, from This is Not a Love Poem (via johnstaymoist)

(Source: pukesplatter, via dreamsinterpretedforbeer)

mariondavies:

Kate Winslet, 1996

mariondavies:

Kate Winslet, 1996

(via dreamsinterpretedforbeer)

halftheskymovement:

Meet twelve women who have transformed the phrase “you play like a girl” into a huge compliment! Among them are Mo’ne Davis, a 13-year-old baseball pitcher who made history when she threw a complete-game shut out that led her team to the Little League World Series; Erin Dimeglio, the first varsity high school football quarterback in the state of Florida; and Billie Jean King, who won 39 Grand Slam titles in tennis.

Read more about these phenomenal women and others via Sports.Mic 

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

"

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

"

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

This. So much this. I cannot stand these movies anymore, I’m so fucking done with this trope. 

(via ecarian)

(via sleepyhypster)

fussmaking:

How did I not know this photo shoot existed?

(Source: malfoysmirks)

smartgirlsattheparty:

inertialicious:

lissymac37:

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

This is so important. Girls pay attention. Boys, if you are a brother, father, cousin of a girl, pay attention.

This is CRITICAL

Smart Girls, we think you’re pretty brilliant :)

(Source: youtube.com)

*74
teamstarkid-confessions:

Confessed by: Anonymous

teamstarkid-confessions:

Confessed by: Anonymous

humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."

(Dharamshala, India)